Safety Skills

Write comment (0 Comments)

The Danger of Distracted Riding

These I believe to be true: Roadies hate – hate! – seeing a driver with their mobile phone glued to their ear or, even worse, holding it in front of them as they text while driving. Roadies love – love! – our bike computers, GPS and other electronic devices. These ever-advancing tools help us measure, gauge performance, map and explore the roads we ride. But are our cycling gadgets becoming a bane to road safety, much like mobile phones? Is distracted riding a danger similar to distracted driving?

Read Full Story

Write comment (0 Comments)

How to Ride in Traffic

This is a complicated subject and the literature contains a wide range of opinions. Some riders never venture into heavy traffic, choosing either to ride on bike paths, drive to "safe" cycling roads or areas, or hang up their wheels. Others get downright surly about their rights to the road, which can lead to driver confrontations, accidents and injury. No cyclist is a match for a 4,000-pound box of metal. Here, I’ll take a middle course. 

Read Full Story

Write comment (2 Comments)

Important Steps to Take Post-Crash

When I finally got around to reviewing the video of my recent crash some three weeks after the fact, it became obvious that there are a number of prudent steps to take if you (or a riding buddy) are ever involved in a crash that results in an injury – and are dealing with the immediate aftermath. Most of this is common-sense stuff, but in the adrenaline-fueled haze of a post-crash period, we sometimes are not at our best or can easily forget something that may be important.

Read Full Story

Write comment (1 Comment)

The Great Helmet Debate - Pros and 'Cons' of Helmet Use

RBR believes in helmets and their usefulness. And we will continue to follow their evolution as a safety tool. We have a long history of being a proponent of helmets and of helping teach road riders the skills and provide the knowledge and tips to help readers learn to ride as safely as possible. If we do nothing else, I’d be fine being known only as a strong advocate of rider safety. (I certainly hope – and believe – we offer much more than that.) So, with that introduction in mind, following is Tom’s article, The Case Against Helmets, and my rebuttal article, The Case For Helmets.

Read Full Story

Write comment (0 Comments)

Identify Yourself

Let's hope you carry your ID when you ride, just as you do at all other times. There are many reasons to carry ID and related important information (health insurance, emergency contact, medical disorders or devices, etc.). And there are numerous ways to carry it, so there's really no excuse not to.

Read Full Story

Write comment (0 Comments)

Distracted Driving Still a Bane to Road Cyclists

Distracted driving of all types is one of the major safety concerns of road cyclists. Phone-glued-to-ear remains a serious enough distraction, but texting while driving (or using apps, email, etc.) can be far more dangerous because it requires a driver to completely take their focus off the road and their surroundings. And, according to a recent AP story, it's only getting worse, even as police resort to novel methods to try to catch texting motorists in the act – from driving in a semi to sit high up with a good view to dressing as a homeless person to patrol at intersections, according to the article.

Read Full Story

Write comment (1 Comment)

‘Super Tuck’ Is Not So Super

One thing that has stood out in both the Tour de France and the US Pro Challenge this year is the extreme descending position adopted by many riders on steep descents. Instead of using the traditional method of sitting on the saddle with the hands next to the stem and pedals horizontal, daring riders have taken to sitting on the top tube. Although several pros have tried this in the past few years, I suspect that because Tinkoff-Saxo's Peter Sagan got lots of camera time in the Tour while squatting on the top tube, the technique has gone mainstream. I can't figure out why.

Read Full Story

Write comment (1 Comment)

Why Not Lights?

I can’t figure out why more riders have not adopted full-time lights as a simple, inexpensive safety feature. Many riders will talk your ear off about how they only wear bright-colored jerseys and never leave home without strapping on their helmet. Yet, they may have their computer on board when they hit the road, but not a light in sight. Here’s what I’ve noticed over the three years I’ve used full-time flashers: Cars in front of you pay you more attention. Drivers see you sooner from behind and give you a wider berth when passing. Flashers are invaluable if you get caught out in a storm.

Read Full Story

Write comment (0 Comments)

How to Handle Touching Wheels in a Group

It’s an innocuous little hill, one of those where you find an easy gear and just spin up. The hill comes right after a stoplight on a big group ride, so the pack is always bunched up on the hill. On a recent day, the group comprised nearly 150 riders – and things got a little touchy on that little hill. Before you even see what is happening, shouts of “riders down” and “crash” begin emanating from the middle of the group. Then you see a rider splay onto the sidewalk to your right, and another two or three riders going down just in front, and to the right of you.

Read Full Story

Write comment (0 Comments)
Write comment (0 Comments)

Preventing Bike Shimmy, Pt. 1

My worst crash happened the first year I rode seriously. East of my Colorado town, Cerro Summit rises 4 miles to a long ridge. Today the road is wide and gently curving, but back then it was narrow with tight bends. I was following an experienced rider on the descent and figured the way to learn how to go downhill was to do what he did. Coming out of the third curve, my entry-level bike began to shimmy violently. I had no idea what to do, got thrown off the bucking bike and catapulted over the bars. Only the ability to fall, honed by contact sports, saved me.

Read Full Story

Write comment (0 Comments)

The Latest VIDEOS & PODCASTS (check main navigation Categories at top of page for more videos)